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Executives Peer-to-peer Groups And Their Benefits: Asia Pacific

At peer groups, you meet with leaders who match your level of management to utilize one another experience and convert knowledge to business value in everyday business life.

You learn, share and apply your knowledge in a professional peer group, and inspire each other with new perspectives, whatever the industry.

Members of a peer group are likely to influence other’s behavior and beliefs. They discuss, comment on and help other members of the group make their business better.

Peer-to-peer groups are a great way to get inexpensive and quality advice. Peer-to-peer groups can be intensely bonding and can provide solutions to long-standing business problems that you might be trying to overcome. At TheNewHandshake, the leaders come together to support each other’s professional development.

What is a Brand? Put simply, it defines the identity of an organisation, product or service. It's more than just names and logos. The identity needs to be based on a unique idea and told through a compelling story. It needs to connect with potential customers and form positive emotional bonds. The idea needs to be distinctive from the competition and relevant to the target markets worldview. It also needs to be authentic, meaning that it's not enough to simply make empty claims. The organisation needs to actually live its brand.

Brands increase the value of products and services by differentiating them from the competition, creating positive mental associations and forming emotional relationships with the customer. Philip Kotler from the Kellogg School of Management famously said that "if you are not a brand, you are a commodity. Then price is everything and the low cost producer is the only winner."

Competing on price may increase short-term sales, but is a dangerous strategy for anyone serious about building a profitable, sustainable business. Brands provide businesses with the means to free themselves from constant price competition, increase the value of their services, reduce their marketing costs and develop long-term customer loyalty.

Building a successful, sustainable brand requires careful planning and consistency. It needs a strategy. Brand strategy is the plan that defines defines the ideas and stories behind the brands, the structure and relationship of the brands within the organisation and the core identifying elements. These can include elements such as company and product names, tone of voice, logo's, colour schemes etc. It also provides the framework for implementing the brands throughout the organisations operations and for using them to efficiently work towards the businesses goals. It's not just a cosmetic exercise; it's a key element of business strategy.

With a clear strategy in place, managers can make appropriate, co-ordinated, informed decisions not just in marketing, but in all departments from product development through to customer service and recruitment. This process of embodying the brand idea throughout the organisation is what we call branding.

The beauty of branding is that by telling your customers authentic, compelling stories, you not only make your goods more attractive and valuable, you give your customers something to talk about. Humans naturally love to tell and share stories. By giving them good stories to tell, you gain access to what is by far the cheapest and most effective form of promotion - word of mouth.

Few organisations manage to achieve the full benefits of word of mouth, and worse still, for many organisations it spreads more negative stories than positive. To compensate for a lack of positive word of mouth, organisations spend huge sums of money on ineffective marketing exercises. Without an effective brand strategy these exercises are often unfocussed, inconsistent and unauthentic. Consequently, they rarely pay for themselves, let alone make a profit.

So what is the role of marketing? To a large extent, branding is the antithesis of marketing. Branding is the most effective way of generating positive word of mouth, making it both cheaper and more effective than traditional marketing techniques.

Marketing without a clear brand strategy is a chaotic, costly exercise that in essence is little more than shouting and showing off about your products and services. People don't like or trust show-offs. If you want to make an impact, you need to talk to them like grown ups. With exposure to thousands of marketing messages every day, consumers have become largely immune to meaningless promotional messages, filtering them out and filing them in their mental recycle bins.

However, there is still a place for marketing and in many cases, marketing is part of the branding process as it provides a means by which to spread the brand story. This explains why there is so much confusion regarding the difference between them. Marketing used to be about the promotion of products and services. Successful marketing now focuses on the promotion of brands.

If an organisation developed a perfect brand idea but did nothing to promote it, then no one would ever have heard about it. The story would never spread and the strategy would be unsuccessful. It's therefore important to combine the strengths of both branding and marketing in order to reach your target market.

The most successful organisations combine a confident and forward thinking idea with a robust and organised strategy. They then use carefully targeted marketing to help get their story out. The success of their brands means that as time goes on, the need for formal marketing reduces and the effectiveness of any existing marketing increases, thus paving the way for increased profits and organisational growth.

In conclusion, brands are a key element of building profitable businesses with long-term sustainability. When executed well, they increase sales, add value to products and services and reduce marketing costs. They also give focus to a business, boost staff morale and increase share value.

Building successful brands is not simply a cosmetic exercise. They need to be consistent, true to the organisation and embodied throughout their activities. This is only possible when a clear brand strategy is in place to act as a framework for their implementation, and to ensure that they are always working towards the business goals. Marketing has its place as a tool for promoting brands, but once they have made a connection with the core of their target market, successful brands can sell themselves through word of mouth.

Strategic Management Of Technological Innovation

Two kinds of peer-to-peer groups are: moderated group, where the members moderate meetings themselves, and facilitated groups, where a trained facilitator runs the meetings.

There are organizations who help put together these groups with a very formalized structure.

While putting together a peer-to-peer group, the important steps are:

  1. Confidentiality. Trust is likely the most important thing the group must have. Everything that happens in the group must stay in the group.
  2. Keep the group membership small. It’s important that everyone in the group has time to speak.
  3. Mandatory meeting attendance. Commitment to the group is one of the keys for group’s success. Meet face-to-face. Meet atleast four times a year; better is to meet once a month.
  4. Agenda. Time is important and make sure its well spent.
  5. Frank and honest discussion. You need to be honest and ask open-ended questions. No personal attacks in group. Peer-to-peer groups help you find your own answers.
  6. Limit Advice. Give advice only when asked. First, learn to listen. Peer-to-peer groups need to understand an issue before anyone starts to give advice.
  7. Different people. Have people from different industries in your group, and you’ll get different points of views. Respect others.
  8. Learning plan. Members must create a learning plan. A good plan sets performance goals.

Peer learning groups in TheNewHandshake accelerate growth for leaders and managers. Peer-to-peer coaching in groups is a powerful approach to leadership development. Peer groups provide a more formalized outlet for learning from the experiences of peers.

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Start with trust – work to create trust within the peer relationships. Curate membership – create a group with shared core values and an environment for growth. Work on relationships.

Peer groups are a fast track to better management. In a peer group everything gets shared and everyone is accountable to each other. Be sure to have an open mind as you enter a peer group. Set some goals on what you want to get out of the experience.

TheNewHandshake is more than just a Business network